THE VIRTUAL HUMAN: IN SILICO METHODS FOR PERSONALISED MEDICINE

Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 04:00 pm – 04:45 pm, Room "Platinum 1"

Prof. Peter V. Coveney

Prof. Peter V. Coveney

Professor, University College London

The era of personalised medicine offers at once a huge opportunity and a major challenge to computational science. The potential impact centres around our ability to marshall substantial quantities of patient data and to use them to perform predictive, mechanistic modelling and simulation in order to deliver therapies and to enhance clinical decision making, on time scales which are far shorter than those usually considered in the context of academic research and development activities. Secure access to personal data, as well as to powerful computational resources, is essential. I shall provide a couple of examples which illustrate the current state of the art. One addresses clinical decision support in the context of blood flow within neurovascular pathologies; the other is concerned with patient specific drug discovery and treatment. We shall discuss the underlying e-infrastructure requirements, including data, compute and networks, and reflect on the potential for cloud and other forms of e-infrastructure provision to meet the anticipated future demand for resources.

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Professor Peter V. Coveney holds a chair in Physical Chemistry, is an Honorary Professor in Computer Science at University College London (UCL), and is Professor Adjunct at Yale University School of Medicine (USA). He is Director of the Centre for Computational Science (CCS) at UCL and Chair of the UK Collaborative Computational Projects Steering Panel. Coveney is active in a broad area of interdisciplinary research including condensed matter physics and chemistry, materials science, as well as life and medical sciences in all of which data-intensive high performance computing plays a major role. He has published more than 350 scientific papers and co-authored two best-selling books (The Arrow of Time and Frontiers of Complexity, both with Roger Highfield). He is lead author of the first textbook on Computational Biomedicine (Oxford University Press, 2014).